Trump should look to Colorado’s marijuana pardons as a guide for his final acts

To loosely quote William Shakespere, “this is (definitely) the winter of our discontent.” In addition to the chaos, tyranny and downright un-American behavior from President Donald Trump during his final days in office, let’s not forget it is also pardoning season.

Trump is preparing a long pardon list of criminals, celebrities, family members and even his lawyers. He is considering preemptive pardons and even pardoning himself.

It’s hard to imagine a president who has been impeached, not once but twice now by the U.S. House of Representatives, could be allowed to pardon anyone, especially given his recent incitement of anger, hostility and violence against the very government he leads. CNN and others are reporting the president plans to issue around 100 pardons and commutations on Tuesday.

And while we will likely see his remaining pardons used in the most appalling ways possible, it is important that pardoning power gets used for what it was intended for: forgiveness and an opportunity for second chances. The question isn’t about whether the president’s pardons are legal, it becomes a moral and ethical question of his use of the power to pardon.

I bring this up because when it comes to doing the right thing in overturning marijuana convictions and giving people a second chance, our state made history (as we tend do on marijuana matters). In October Gov. Jared…

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To loosely quote William Shakespere, “this is (definitely) the winter of our discontent.” In addition to the chaos, tyranny and downright un-American behavior from President Donald Trump during his final days in office, let’s not forget it is also pardoning season.

Trump is preparing a long pardon list of criminals, celebrities, family members and even his lawyers. He is considering preemptive pardons and even pardoning himself.

It’s hard to imagine a president who has been impeached, not once but twice now by the U.S. House of Representatives, could be allowed to pardon anyone, especially given his recent incitement of anger, hostility and violence against the very government he leads. CNN and others are reporting the president plans to issue around 100 pardons and commutations on Tuesday.

And while we will likely see his remaining pardons used in the most appalling ways possible, it is important that pardoning power gets used for what it was intended for: forgiveness and an opportunity for second chances. The question isn’t about whether the president’s pardons are legal, it becomes a moral and ethical question of his use of the power to pardon.

I bring this up because when it comes to doing the right thing in overturning marijuana convictions and giving people a second chance, our state made history (as we tend do on marijuana matters). In October Gov. Jared…

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